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  1. #631
    Biệt Thự Triển's Avatar
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    Trong cây hơi hè cùng heo may
    Vi vu qua muôn cành mơ say....


    Seven five kilometers completed,
    remaining distance zero kilometer,
    duration one hour, eighteen minutes,
    fifty-one seconds..
    ..


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  2. #632
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    Cái vụ này có nha. Người đồng nghiệp tui sở hữu một cánh rừng tư gia có
    gần 20 cây sồi có tuổi từ khi ba ảnh chưa sanh. Hôm cuối tuần thanh tra lâm
    nghiệp thành phố viết giấy kêu ảnh phải chặt bỏ 20 cây sồi trên khoảng đất trống
    quanh nhà ảnh trước khi các con bọ này lớn lên bay sang lây các cây khác
    trong rừng gần nhà.
    Ảnh kể vợ ảnh vừa đứng coi ảnh cưa máy và con ảnh dùng xe cần cẩu chất lên xe
    tải vừa khóc. Tuy nhiên không chặt bỏ thì những người kiểm lâm cũng sẽ đến
    chặt bỏ, lúc đó tiền phạt lẫn tiền chặt dọn còn nhiều hơn gia đình ảnh tự làm.


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  3. #633
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    Quote Originally Posted by Triển View Post

    Tháng 7 nắng hạn ....








    Tháng 8 mát mẻ....





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  4. #634
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    Why should you start walking for heart health? Walking doesn't get the respect it deserves, either for its health benefits, its value for transportation, or its role in recreation.

    Aerobics, walking and health


    Ever since the 1970s, the aerobic doctrine has dominated the discussion of exercise and health. In a scientific update of your high school coach's slogan "no pain, no gain," the doctrine holds that the benefits of exercise depend on working hard enough to boost your heart rate to 70% to 85% of its maximum, sustaining that effort continuously for 20 to 60 minutes, and repeating the workout at least three times a week.

    Aerobic exercise training is indeed the best way to score well on a treadmill test that measures aerobic capacity. It is excellent preparation for athletic competition. And it's great for health. But intense workouts carry a risk for injury, and aerobic exercise is hard work. Although the aerobic doctrine inspired the few, it discouraged the many.

    Running is the poster boy for aerobic exercise. With some preparation and a few precautions, it really is splendid for fitness and health. But it's not the only way to exercise for health. Perhaps because they've seen so many hard-breathing, sweat-drenched runners counting their pulse rates, ordinary guys often assume that less intense exercise is a waste of time. In fact, though, moderate exercise is excellent for health — and walking is the poster boy for moderate exercise.

    Walking and exercise guidelines

    The benefits of physical activity depend on three elements: the intensity, duration, and frequency of exercise.

    Because walking is less intensive than running, you have to walk for longer periods, get out more often, or both to match the benefits of running. As a rough guide, the current American Heart Association/American College of Sports Medicine standards call for able-bodied adults to do moderate-intensity exercise (such as brisk walking) for at least 30 minutes on five days each week or intense aerobic exercise (such as running) for at least 20 minutes three days each week. That makes running seem much more time-efficient — but if you factor in the extra warm-ups, cool-downs, and changes of clothing and shoes that runners need, the time differences narrow considerably. Add the time it takes to rehab from running injuries, and walking looks pretty good.

    Mix and match to suit your health, abilities, personal preferences, and daily schedules. Walk, jog, bike, swim, garden, golf, dance, or whatever, as long as you keep moving. Remember that Einstein himself explained, "Life is like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving."

    Walking for heart health


    Hundreds of medical studies show that regular exercise is good for health — very good, in fact. But many of these studies lump various forms of exercise together to investigate how the total amount of physical activity influences health. It's important research, but it doesn't necessarily prove that walking, in and of itself, is beneficial.

    In a report that included findings from multiple well done studies, researchers found that walking reduced the risk of cardiovascular events by 31% cut the risk of dying by 32%. These benefits were equally robust in men and women. Protection was evident even at distances of just 5½ miles per week and at a pace as casual as about 2 miles per hour. The people who walked longer distances, walked at a faster pace, or both enjoyed the greatest protection.

    Benefits of walking for your health

    The cardiovascular benefits of walking are biologically plausible; like other forms of regular moderate exercise, walking improves cardiac risk factors such as cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, vascular stiffness and inflammation, and mental stress. And if cardiac protection and a lower death rate are not enough to get you moving, consider that walking and other moderate exercise programs also help protect against dementia, peripheral artery disease, obesity, diabetes, depression, colon cancer, and even erectile dysfunction.

    Ready, set, walk.

    Walking vs. running

    Walking is not simply slow running; competitive racewalkers can zip by recreational joggers. The difference between the two is not based on pace. At any speed, walkers have one foot on the ground at all times, but runners are entirely airborne during some part of every stride. As the pace increases, the percentage of each stride that is airborne increases; competitive runners have "hang times" of about 45%.

    What goes up must come down. That's why running is a high-impact activity. Each time they land, runners subject their bodies to a stress equal to about three times their body weight. In just one mile, a typical runner's legs will have to absorb more than 100 tons of impact force. It's a testament to the human body that running can be safe and enjoyable. At the same time, though, it's a testament to the force of gravity that walkers have a much lower (1% to 5%) risk of exercise-related injuries than runners (20% to 70%).


    Walkers have one foot on the ground at all times.

    Daily life of a walker

    Make walking part of your daily life. Walk to work and to the store. If it's too far, try walking to the train instead of driving there, and then get off the bus or subway a few stops before your destination. Instead of competing for the closest parking space or paying extra for a nearby lot, park farther away and walk to your destination. Go for a walk at lunchtime instead of spending all your time in the cafeteria.

    You don't need any special equipment to walk in the course of your daily life. Supportive street shoes will suffice, but if you prefer, you can change into walking shoes for your commute or lunchtime stroll. And since you don't need to push yourself enough to sweat, you don't need special clothing; just stay warm in the winter, cool in the summer, and dry in the rain. But when the weather is really harsh or the streets slippery, put safety first and walk down long hallways, in a mall, or on the stairs (see box).

    Walking your steps to health

    Walking on streets and trails is superb for health. And so is walking up stairs. Coaches, cardiologists, and housewives have long been in on the secret of stairs. Many football coaches "ask" their players to charge up flight after flight of stadium steps to get in shape, and other competitive athletes put gymnasium stairwells to similar use. In the days before stress testing held sway, doctors would often walk up stairs with their patients to check out cardiopulmonary function. Even today, cardiologists tell heart patients they are fit enough to have sex if they can walk up two or three flights comfortably, and surgeons may clear patients for lung operations if they can manage five or six flights. As for housewives, taking care of a two- or three-story home is one reason American women outlive their husbands by an average of more than five years.

    What's so special about stairs? Researchers in Canada answered the question by monitoring 17 healthy male volunteers with an average age of 64 while they walked, lifted weights, or climbed stairs. Stair climbing was the most demanding. It was twice as taxing as brisk walking on the level and 50% harder than walking up a steep incline or lifting weights. And peak exertion was attained much faster climbing stairs than walking, which is why nearly everyone huffs and puffs going upstairs, at least until the "second wind" kicks in after a few flights.

    Because stairs are so taxing, only the very young at heart should attempt to charge up long flights. But at a slow, steady pace, stairs can be a health plus for the rest of us. Begin modestly with a flight or two, and then add more as you improve. Take the stairs whenever you can; if you have a long way to go, walk part way, and then switch to an elevator. Use the railing for balance and security (especially going down), and don't try the stairs after a heavy meal or if you feel unwell.

    Even at a slow pace, you'll burn calories two to three times faster climbing stairs than walking briskly on the level. The Harvard Alumni Study found that men who average at least eight flights a day enjoy a 33% lower mortality rate than men who are sedentary — and that's even better than the 22% lower death rate men earned by walking 1.3 miles a day.

    Does walking for transportation pay off? And how! A study of 12,000 adults found that people who live in cities have a lower risk of being overweight and obese than people who live in the suburbs. In Atlanta, for example, 45% of suburban men were overweight and 23% were obese; among urbanites, however, only 37% were overweight and 13% obese. The explanation: driving vs. walking. To stay well, walk for 30 to 45 minutes nearly every day. Do it all at once or in chunks as short as five to 10 minutes. Aim for a brisk pace of three to four miles an hour, but remember that you'll get plenty of benefit from strolling at a slower pace as long as you stick with it.

    If you want to set more precise goals, aim for two to four miles a day. As a rule of thumb, urban walkers can count 12 average city blocks as one mile. Another way to keep track of your distance is to buckle a pedometer to your belt. Some just keep track of your steps, while others have bells and whistles such as timers, clocks, alarms, and bells — or at least chimes that ring out little tunes. You can get a decent pedometer for under $40. Even the best models can sometimes mistake a jiggle for a step, but a pedometer can help you keep track and can motivate you to take extra steps whenever you can. If you have an average stride length, count 2,000 steps as about a mile of walking. And if you're counting steps, you can use another rule of thumb to estimate your intensity: 80 steps a minute indicates a leisurely pace; 100 steps a minute, a moderate to brisk pace; and 120 steps a minute, a fast pace. Even without counting, you'll do well simply by reminding yourself to walk briskly. It's the only direction that researchers gave to a group of 84 overweight, sedentary volunteers, yet even without athletic experience, all of them achieved heart rates in the moderate 58% to 70% of maximum range.

    Walking for transportation is a good way to start any exercise program, and it's an excellent way to protect your health. Still, many men will get extra benefit from setting aside dedicated time to walk for exercise, health, and pleasure.

    Are benefits of walking for health genetic or kinetic?

    The meta-analysis of 18 walking studies did not address a question that has bedeviled most studies of exercise and health: is the exercise itself protective, or do genetically healthier people simply tend to exercise more? But another important European study sheds light on the issue.

    To learn if the effects of exercise depend on genetics and early family life, doctors in Finland studied nearly 16,000 same-sex twins. The participants were all healthy when the study began in 1975. All the volunteers provided information on their exercise habits and other known predictors of mortality. People who reported exercising for more than 30 minutes at least six times a month at an intensity corresponding to brisk walking were classified as conditioning exercisers, subjects who exercised less were considered occasional exercisers, and those who did not exercise were considered sedentary.

    During the study's 20-year follow-up, 1,253 participants died. Even after accounting for other risk factors, exercise proved strongly protective, reducing the death rate of conditioning exercisers by 43% and occasional exercisers by 29%. But was the protection genetic or kinetic? Even among genetically similar twins, exercise was a strong independent predictor of survival. Twins who exercised regularly were 56% less likely to die during the study period than their sedentary siblings, and even twins who exercised only occasionally had a 34% lower death rate than their sedentary sibs.

    Your shoes may have more to say about your health than your genes.

    Put on your walking shoes

    Whether you walk in a business suit or a sweat suit, on city streets or country roads, it's still the same left, right, left for health. In fact, it's not a question of either/or, since every walk you take is a step toward good health.

    Walking for walking's sake shows you are giving exercise the priority it deserves. It will get you away from the demanding routines of daily life, a nice plus for mental health. And by changing into walking shoes and athletic togs, you'll be able to build up to a pace that's difficult to achieve on the way to work.

    Good shoes are important. Most major athletic brands offer shoes especially designed for walking. Fit and comfort are more important than style; your shoes should feel supportive but not snug or constricting. Look for a padded tongue and heel pad. The uppers should be light, breathable, and flexible, the insole moisture-resistant, and the sole shock-absorbent. The heel wedge should be raised, so the sole at the back of the shoe is two times thicker than at the front. Finally, the toe box should be roomy, even when you're wearing athletic socks.

    Your shoes are worth a little thought, but your clothing is strictly a matter of common sense and personal preference. A T-shirt and shorts are fine in warm weather. An ordinary sweat suit will do nicely when it's cool, but a nylon athletic suit may be more comfortable. Add layers as the temperature drops; gloves and a hat are particularly important. If you really get into it, a water-repellent suit of Gore-Tex or a similar synthetic fabric will keep you warm without getting soggy with sweat.

    For safety's sake, pick brightly colored outer garments, and always wear a reflector on country roads if it's dark. Walk facing cars if you don't have a sidewalk underfoot, and avoid high-speed and congested traffic. Beware of dogs and, for that matter, people; be sure unfamiliar locations are safe, and even then, try to walk with a companion.

    Before you take a serious walk, stretch to warm up; stretch again to cool down afterwards. Start out at a slow pace, and slow down toward the end of your walk as well. Begin with routes that are well within your range, and then extend your distances as you improve. The same is true of your pace; begin modestly, then pick up your speed as you get into shape. Intersperse a brisk clip with a less strenuous stride, and then gradually extend these speedier intervals. Add hills for variety and additional intensity.

    One of the nice things about walking is that you don't need special skill, much less lessons. The main thing is to walk naturally and comfortably. But if you want to aim for an ideal stride, a few tips may help. Try to keep your posture erect with your chin up, your eyes forward, and your shoulders square. Keep your back straight, belly flat, and butt tucked in. Keep your arms close to your torso, bent at the elbow. Take a natural stride, but try to lengthen your stride as you improve. Land on your heels, and then roll forward to push off with your toes. Swing your arms with each stride, and keep up a steady, rhythmic cadence.

    To stay motivated, walk with a friend or listen to a radio or MP3 player. And for some people, the best motivation is a dog — studies show that owning pets is good for health, and walking the dog is a major reason for this benefit.

    To avoid problems, back off if you are ill or injured, always listen to your body, stay well-hydrated, and avoid hazardous conditions. Consider walking in a mall if it's too hot, cold, wet, or slippery outdoors. You can also consider using a treadmill at home or at a health club ("chẳng đặng đừng!!!!!).

    Walking and weight loss

    Exercise burns calories. In the case of walking and running, the calories you burn depend much more on the distance you cover and your body weight than on your pace. This table shows calories burned per mile of walking or jogging on the level for people of varying weights:

    A hundred or so calories a mile might not seem like much, but they can add up to better weight control. For example, a 2009 study of 4,995 men and women found that the average American gains about 2.2 pounds a year during middle age. But during the 15-year study, people who walked gained significantly less weight than those who didn't; the more walking, the less weight gain. And the benefit was greatest in the heaviest individuals. For example, walking for just 35 minutes a day saved a 160-pound person about 18 pounds of flab over 15 years of aging.

    Walking calorie calculator


    Your weight

    Approximate calories per mile
    120 lbs 85
    140 lbs
    95
    160 lbs
    105
    180 lbs
    115
    200 lbs
    125
    220 lbs
    135


    Walking the walk

    Walking has it all. Simple and natural, it doesn't require any instruction or skill. It can be a very modest form of exercise or it can demand enough skill and intensity to be an Olympic sport. You can walk alone for solitude or with friends for companionship. You can walk indoors on a treadmill or outside in the city or country, at home or away. You can get all the benefits of moderate exercise with a very low risk of injury. And to boot, walking is inexpensive. All things considered, Charles Dickens got it right: "Walk to be healthy, walk to be happy."


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  5. #635
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  6. #636
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    Nhơn đọc bài báo này của trang nguoi-viet dot com: Hơn 50% giới trẻ Mỹ nghỉ việc vì sức khỏe tâm thần

    Rồi đi tìm cái nguồn bài rì pọoc chính tiếng Anh để coi thực hư: How much do we actually know about workplace mental health?.

    Rồi ngẫm nghĩ lại vụ ca cẩm bán than của cô ký điệu mới giựt mình, ủa se sẻ tên thì nghe nhỏ
    chớ đâu phải thế hệ Z hay thế hệ Millennials ta, trẻ lắm thì cũng thế hệ chữ ách xì chớ sao mà nghe cô ký điệu thường xuyên bán than hoài ta?







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  7. #637
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    Quote Originally Posted by Triển View Post

    Nhơn đọc bài báo này của trang nguoi-viet dot com: Hơn 50% giới trẻ Mỹ nghỉ việc vì sức khỏe tâm thần

    Rồi đi tìm cái nguồn bài rì pọoc chính tiếng Anh để coi thực hư: How much do we actually know about workplace mental health?.

    Rồi ngẫm nghĩ lại vụ ca cẩm bán than của cô ký điệu mới giựt mình, ủa se sẻ tên thì nghe nhỏ
    chớ đâu phải thế hệ Z hay thế hệ Millennials ta, trẻ lắm thì cũng thế hệ chữ ách xì chớ sao mà nghe cô ký điệu thường xuyên bán than hoài ta?


    Hello sư huynh,
    Cuối tuần này se sẻ làm việc nặng nè, nghĩ theo chiều hướng tích cực vận động muốn hết bin luôn leo lên móc nhà rửa cái máng xối. Cộng thêm giặc thảm, clean nhà (trong & ngoài luôn), dọn nhà cho gọn lại để bán. Người ta nói có bột mới bắt thành bán, phần bột này em cày quá chừng mới được chứ để rủi như trận khủng hoảng kinh tế tới thì sẽ bay mất, se sẻ tính lui tính tới cuối cùng em thấy nhà bank lời, tiền chấm commission cho realtor, closing cost fees ăn hết chơn. Lần tới là pay cash only no more mortgage



    Cái tủ lạnh bị hư, em đã thay water filter đèn sáng được nhưng phần lạnh vẫn chưa được, hiệu Samsung (samsung refrigerator repair 2011 models) 2 cửa giống cái link bên dưới, nếu sư huynh, anh chị nào biết cho Chiều xin tips, em muốn thử sửa trước khi gọi người tới sửa, hoặc tiễn ra ngoài đường bỏ.

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/samsung-24-...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

    Bây giờ se sẻ phải vô ôm laptop cày tí rãnh vô trò chuyện tiếp ha.
    Last edited by chieubuon_09; 10-14-2019 at 03:29 AM.

  8. #638
    Biệt Thự Triển's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chieubuon_09 View Post
    Hello sư huynh,
    Cuối tuần này se sẻ làm việc nặng nè, nghĩ theo chiều hướng tích cực vận động muốn hết bin luôn leo lên móc nhà rửa cái máng xối. Cộng thêm giặc thảm, clean nhà (trong & ngoài luôn), dọn nhà cho gọn lại để bán. Người ta nói có bột mới bắt thành bán, phần bột này em cày quá chừng mới được chứ để rủi như trận khủng hoảng kinh tế tới thì sẽ bay mất, se sẻ tính lui tính tới cuối cùng em thấy nhà bank lời, tiền chấm commission cho realtor, closing cost fees ăn hết chơn. Lần tới là pay cash only no more mortgage



    Cái tủ lạnh bị hư, em đã thay water filter đèn sáng được nhưng phần lạnh vẫn chưa được, hiệu Samsung (samsung refrigerator repair 2011 models) 2 cửa giống cái link bên dưới, nếu sư huynh, anh chị nào biết cho Chiều xin tips, em muốn thử sửa trước khi gọi người tới sửa, hoặc tiễn ra ngoài đường bỏ.

    https://www.lowes.com/pd/samsung-24-...E&gclsrc=aw.ds

    Bây giờ se sẻ phải vô ôm laptop cày tí rãnh vô trò chuyện tiếp ha.

    Ba cái này thì coi trong user guide coi sao. Chớ sư huynh không biết sửa máy móc gì đâu, toàn là "ma rốc" kêu thợ không hà.

    Manuals & Download: https://www.samsung.com/us/support/o...y-side-rs25j5/
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  9. #639
    Biệt Thự Triển's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Triển View Post


    Nhơn đọc bài báo này của trang nguoi-viet dot com: Hơn 50% giới trẻ Mỹ nghỉ việc vì sức khỏe tâm thần

    Rồi đi tìm cái nguồn bài rì pọoc chính tiếng Anh để coi thực hư: How much do we actually know about workplace mental health?.

    Rồi ngẫm nghĩ lại vụ ca cẩm bán than của cô ký điệu mới giựt mình, ủa se sẻ tên thì nghe nhỏ
    chớ đâu phải thế hệ Z hay thế hệ Millennials ta, trẻ lắm thì cũng thế hệ chữ ách xì chớ sao mà nghe cô ký điệu thường xuyên bán than hoài ta?








    Hãy nhắc nhở bọn trẻ chơi thể thao để quân bình tâm trí.
    Đi bộ, chạy bộ, bơi lội. Dễ làm, không cần người thứ hai thứ ba,
    bất kể thời tiết, không cần dụng cụ. Lợi ích vô cùng.





    For Depression and Anxiety, Running Is a Unique Therapy

    Running puts everyone in a better mood. But for some of us, our miles are key to managing depression and anxiety.

    Scott Douglas
    May 2, 2019

    October 10 is World Mental Health Day, a chance for raising awareness of mental health issues around the world and mobilizing efforts in support of the effort.

    oOo

    Most Tuesdays, I run early in the morning with a woman named Meredith. For such close friends, we’re quite different. Meredith is a voluble social worker who draws energy from crowds. I’m an introverted editor who works from home. Meredith runs her best in large races and loves training with big groups. I’ve set PRs in solo time trials and tend to bail when a run’s head count gets above five. Meredith is a worrier, beset by regrets and anticipated outcomes, who has sought treatment for anxiety. I have dysthymia, or chronic low-grade depression. We like to joke that Meredith stays up late as a way of avoiding the next day, whereas I go to bed early to speed the arrival of a better tomorrow.

    We do have one key thing in common: Meredith and I run primarily to bolster our mental health. Like all runners, we relish the short-term experience of finishing our run feeling like we’ve hit reset and can better handle the rest of the day. What’s not universal is our recognition that, without regular running, the underlying fabric of our lives—our friendships, our marriages, our careers, our odds of being something other than miserable most of the time—will fray. For those of us with depression or anxiety, we need running like a diabetic needs insulin.

    Meredith and I discovered this decades ago, and now researchers and practitioners are starting to catch up. Studies show that aerobic exercise can be as effective as anti-depressants in treating mild to moderate depression (and with side effects like improved health and weight management rather than bloating and sexual dysfunction). In countries such as Australia, United Kingdom, and the Netherlands, official guidelines include exercise as a first-line treatment for depression. Although U.S. guidelines have yet to change, at least one psychotherapist, Sepideh Saremi in Los Angeles, California, conducts on-the-run sessions with willing patients.

    How does moving the body change the mind? A growing body of work—both in the lab and with patients—shows that there’s more to it than endorphins, the well-known opioid the body produces during certain activities, including exercise. The emerging, more sophisticated view of running to improve mental health also takes into account long-term structural changes in the brain as well as subjective states like mood and cognition. Science continues working to explain the theory behind what we runners already know from practice.

    Think Different

    Unlike many with the condition, I’ve never been majorly incapacitated by depression. Most people would consider me productive, accomplished, perhaps even energetic, given that my lifetime running odometer is past 110,000 miles. My dysthymia has two main components: weltschmerz, a German word meaning sadness about how reality doesn’t live up to one’s hopes, and anhedonia, a diminished ability to experience pleasure. Life often feels like waiting out a series of not-horrible, not-fun obligations. Things sometimes seem so pointless that I watch myself not caring that I don’t care. For example, I once received a group email that a book I’d coauthored had made The New York Times best seller list. That’s a big deal in publishing. As if from outside, I observed myself writing an exclamation-point-filled reply-all response thanking and congratulating those of us who worked on the book. As I typed I thought, “Yeah, fine, whatever. Is this really going to lift life above 2 p.m. on a gray Tuesday in March?”

    That it’s possible to be outwardly active but internally askew can mask just how common depression and anxiety are. In any one year, about 10 percent of the U.S. population would meet the diagnostic criteria for depression, and about 20 percent for anxiety. (The two often coexist.) The incidence of those conditions in the running population is probably similar; a 2017 review of research published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found no difference in depressive symptoms between what the researchers called “high-performance athletes” and nonathletes. All levels of runners are affected, with elites such as Olympian Adam Goucher and Western States 100-mile champions Rob Krar and Nikki Kimball having spoken publicly about their depression.

    Of course, everybody gets sad and worried at times. What distinguishes those feelings from clinical depression and anxiety? In the short term, therapists often look for significant changes in emotions, behavior, and psychological functioning. They also focus on how symptoms such as feeling agitated, threatened, and uncomfortable (for anxiety) or joyless, lethargic, and apathetic (for depression) interfere with people’s everyday functioning. “I look at how these things affect activities of daily living, like sleeping, going to work, interpersonal relationships,” says Franklin Brooks, Ph.D., a clinical social worker in Portland, Maine. “There’s a profound difference between ‘I’m having a bad day at work’ and ‘I’m having a bad day at work and I’m not going to get out of bed tomorrow because of it.’”

    That classic depiction of depression sounds like what Amelia Gapin, 34, a software engineer and marathoner from Jersey City, New Jersey, has experienced. “I’ve had episodes where, for six weeks, two months, I couldn’t even get myself out of bed,” she says. “During the weekends it was wake up and take a couple hours to move myself to the couch.”

    Ian Kellogg, 22, a 14:43 PR 5K college runner at Otterbein University in Westerville, Ohio, says, “When I fall into depression, I more often than not don’t run. I can’t find the energy or willpower to get out the door, even though I know my training is suffering and that just half an hour will make me feel better.”

    Pati Haaz, 42, also knows this form of depression but was able to use running to overcome it. In June 2015, the finance professional from Kendall Park, New Jersey, had a miscarriage while two months pregnant. She became severely depressed and started missing work. “I didn’t want to get out of bed, I didn’t want to go out of my house,” she says. “It was that feeling that there’s no point in continuing. I had no motivation to do anything other than take care of my kids, which was more an automatic duty.” Guilt over being depressed—“feeling like I’m the worst mother in the world”—compounded the situation.

    Haaz started seeing a therapist who asked about Haaz’s pre-depression hobbies. Haaz said that she was a runner who, before becoming pregnant, had planned to run her first marathon that fall in New York City. The therapist encouraged her to resume running. Haaz decided she needed the goal of finishing a marathon to overcome the inertia that depression had introduced to her life.

    She found that marathon training helped in two key ways. “If I was running for the sake of running, I would have stopped with my normal six-mile run,” Haaz says. “But I was doing 16, 18, 20 miles, things I’d never done before. I was able to carry this sense of accomplishment into other areas.”

    Even her shortest runs helped Haaz think differently. “If I was driving or working or waking up in the middle of the night and thinking about the things that were making me sad, it would just make things worse—it would become like a spiral, and there was no end to it. But when I was running, I would think about those same things, and somehow I was able to process them differently. I would start my run with all these negative thoughts, and after a mile or two, they were gone.” Five months after her miscarriage, Haaz finished New York City in 6:38.

    Reframing ruminations—thinking differently about hashed-over topics—is one of the main appeals of running for those of us with mental health issues. Cecilia Bidwell, 42, an attorney from Tampa, Florida, who has anxiety, puts it this way: “When I’m running, the thoughts come in and out, and I’m not worried,” she says. “I can think about things objectively. I realize that things that I’m thinking are a huge deal aren’t a big deal in the scheme of things.” The effect carries through Bidwell’s stressful work days. “When I’ve gone for a good run in the morning, if things are going haywire at 2 p.m. I’m handling them a lot better. I’m not creating crises and wondering, ‘Why am I here?’”

    The more-immediate cognitive focus of a typical run also contributes to its efficacy. “When we’re overwhelmed with anxiety and depression, shifting from the big picture—all the frustrations, worst-case scenario thinking—to the small, in-the-moment task of doing something that approaches a goal, like running a four-mile loop with two hills, will kick off a positive feedback loop that continues throughout the run and takes our thinking and emotions out of the trench of negativity,” says Laura Fredendall, Psy.D.

    These changes in mood and thinking are more accessible for runners. In a 2008 study published in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ultramarathoners, moderate regular exercisers, and non-exercisers walked or ran for 30 minutes at a self-selected pace that felt somewhat hard. After the workout, everyone’s mood had improved, but that of the ultramarathoners and moderate exercisers did so about twice as much as that of the sedentary people. Also, the ultrarunners and regular exercisers reported greater vigor and less fatigue after the workout than before, while the non-exercisers felt the same.

    The reason is that runners can hold a good pace for a long time without going anaerobic, and that allows the physiological processes that lead to improved mood, according to Panteleimon Ekkekakis, Ph.D., a professor at Iowa State University who is a leading figure in the field of exercise psychology. “In sedentary folks, their ventilatory threshold—the point where exercise is no longer purely aerobic—is very low,” he says. “So they get up off the couch, they take a few steps, they’re already above their ventilatory threshold. If you’re a regular runner, you have the cardiorespiratory fitness to sustain an exercise intensity that’s associated with a feel-better effect.”

    My Chemical Romance


    What causes that feel-better effect? Although the quick answer is usually endorphins, they’re not the only relevant aspect of brain chemistry. What’s more, focusing on the nebulous “runner’s high” ignores crucial changes in brain structure and thinking patterns that running can induce.

    Endorphins entered the runner’s lexicon in the 1970s. That’s when it became known that these chemicals, which bind to neuron receptors in the brain, are released at higher levels during a run. Several studies found that higher blood levels of postrun endorphins correlated to improved mood. In terms of the brain, however, a strong correlation between endorphin levels and improved mood wasn’t demonstrated until 2008. German researchers used PET scans, an imaging study often used to check for cancer, on triathletes’ brains while the athletes ran for two hours. They found high levels of endorphins in the prefrontal cortex and other parts of the brain associated with mood, and that these levels aligned with the athletes’ reports of euphoria.

    But endorphins aren’t everything. As part of his research into human evolution, David Raichlen, Ph.D., a professor of anthropology at the University of Arizona, has measured pre- and postrun endocannabinoid levels in runners, dogs, and ferrets. Endocannabinoids are substances that bind to the same receptors in the brain as THC, the primary substance responsible for a marijuana high.

    Raichlen says there are two leading theories on why running causes increased levels of endorphins and endocannabinoids. First, when humans became hunter/gatherers close to 2 million years ago, they became more active; the release of these chemicals, which act as pain relievers, may have evolved to allow longer, faster movement. In this scenario, the feel-good aspect is a byproduct. Second, higher levels of these chemicals while active could have motivated continued movement, which would lead to getting more food and ultimately higher survival rates. Raichlen says the two mechanisms might have worked in tandem.

    Whatever the original mechanism for these evolutionary adaptations, they’re especially helpful for modern runners with mental-health issues. It’s nice to run for an hour and go from being in a good-enough mood to a better one. It’s a fundamental shift to go from being miserable to content, thanks to an infusion of feel-good substances. “I’ll finish a run and be like, ‘Wow, this is how most people feel all the time,’” Bidwell says.

    A short-term mood boost thanks to endorphins and endocannibinoids is one thing. (Granted, one much-appreciated thing.) But where running really helps with mental health is over time, thanks to a change in brain structure. A review of research published in Clinical Psychology Review concluded “exercise training recruits a process which confers enduring resilience to stress.” This appears to occur because regular running produces the same two changes that are thought to be responsible for the effectiveness of anti-depressants: increased levels of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine, and neurogenesis, or the creation of new neurons.

    Neurogenesis occurs primarily due to a protein called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which has been been called the Miracle-Gro of the brain. “It helps neurons fire and wire together,” Fredendall says. Much of this happens in the hippocampus, an area of the brain that’s often shrunken in people with depression. “MRI scans have shown that even after a six-month exercise intervention, there’s a visible increase in the size of the hippocampus,” Ekkekakis says.

    As Ekkekakis notes, you have to be fit to really get the daily benefits that can lead to structural changes. Of course, you also have to get yourself out the door, which can be especially difficult if you’re depressed. But success in running on an especially tough day makes it easier to get out the next time. And it can spur another key mental health benefit of running.

    I Think I Can, I Think I Can

    Levels of chemicals in the brain are only part of your mental state. There’s also cognition, or mental processes. Cognition includes not just straightforward thinking (“I should run long today because a blizzard is coming tomorrow”) but also more involved phenomena, such as how you think about your thoughts.

    A hallmark of depression is self-defeating, absolutist thinking—“everything is harder than it should be,” “there’s no pleasure in my life,” “it’s always going to be like this.” I’ve learned that lacing up and hitting the roads is my best way to break free from such thoughts. On a daily basis, running reminds me that I can overcome apathy and torpor. Seeing that small victory, I can convince myself that progress is possible on meeting professional goals, or not feeling lonely so often, or figuring out how to afford retirement. “The subjective experience of seeing yourself do something can make you feel better,” Fredendall says.

    Ekkekakis says cognition is key to understanding another aspect of running’s effectiveness. “If you take anti-depressants and they make you feel better, the psychological attribution is external—the patients believe that the reason they get better is because of the drug they take,” he says. “With exercise, the attribution is internal—the reason I get better is that I’m doing this thing, I’m putting in the effort. That’s where perhaps the additional benefit of exercise compared to anti-depressants lies—that sense of empowerment, that sense that I’m taking control of my situation.”



    You Don’t Hear About the Golfer’s High

    Is there something uniquely effective about running for managing mental health? Or can any form of exercise provide similar relief?

    The short answer is nobody knows for sure, and definitive research comparing the mood-boosting properties of various ways of working out is unlikely. “Such a study would have multiple arms—optimal intensity, duration, or frequency of different forms of exercise—so you go from a study costing $1 million to $3 million,” Ekkekakis says. “The pharmaceutical companies fund their own studies, but who is going to fund the exercise studies? The amount of government funding available is simply not at that level.” (According to the World Health Organization, depression is the leading cause of disability and poor health worldwide, but on average only 3 percent of government health budgets is spent on mental-health issues.)

    It is safe to say that purposeful exercise is better than incidental physical activity. A study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise found improved mood in people after they worked out, but not after daily-living activities such as climbing stairs. Aerobic exercise seems more effective than something like lifting weights. In fact, a review of research published in Preventive Medicine found that people with low levels of cardiovascular fitness were at greater risk of developing depression.

    When I asked Raichlen about running compared to other activities, he began by citing more studies on endocannabinoids and talking about “mechanical pain” and “analgesic triggers.” Then the practical runner in him took over.

    “It’s much easier to get yourself into a reasonable intensity compared to a lot of other sports,” he says. “It’s not too difficult to get in the right zone and stay there. You have a lot more control over your speed than even in something like cycling, where your effort level is more dictated by the topography or even stop lights.”

    “I’ve dabbled with triathlons a little,” says Rich Harfst, 54, a federal government employee and marathoner from Annandale, Virginia, who was diagnosed with depression as a teenager. “I’ve done yoga, I’ve done cycling. Nothing is the same as running.” Ultrarunner Krar, who also mountain bikes and competes in ski mountaineering, says, “Running is that perfect balance where you can push yourself as hard as you like and more easily get in that flow state.” Bidwell says that when she doesn’t run, her anxiety puts her basic state at a 4 out of 10. “Running normally gets me to an 8,” she says. “When I’m hurt and swim instead, I’m at 6.”

    That’s been my experience over the last nearly four decades. When I’ve been injured and switch to cycling or pool running, the workouts themselves are like proverbial castor oil—I do them because I know I need them, not because they’re enjoyable in themselves. The net that keeps me from plummeting starts to fray and sag.

    But when running is going well, the net is taut and strong. A few times a month, usually while cruising along a wooded trail speckled with morning light, I’m overcome with a sensation best articulated as simply “yes.” Yes to the moment, yes to whatever is in store the rest of the day, yes to life itself. If I could bottle that feeling, I’d eventually forget what it’s like to be depressed.

    This article was adapted from Running Is My Therapy by Scott Douglas, released in 2018.




    Scott Douglas
    Scott is a veteran running, fitness, and health journalist who has held senior editorial positions at Runner’s World and Running Times.

    /* src.: https://www.runnersworld.com/health-...ty-depression/




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  10. #640
    Biệt Thự chieubuon_09's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Triển View Post

    Ba cái này thì coi trong user guide coi sao. Chớ sư huynh không biết sửa máy móc gì đâu, toàn là "ma rốc" kêu thợ không hà.

    Manuals & Download: https://www.samsung.com/us/support/o...y-side-rs25j5/
    Hôm qua sau khi ăn tối xong, se sẻ tìm hiểu về tủ lanh, check lại model number của máy, tìm được link User manual. Em đã đọc để biết về những button functionality, đọc tiếp về những nguyên nhân đã làm cho máy không lạnh:

    1. Faulty Door Gaskets
    2. Dirty Condenser Coils
    3. Frost-free Feature Not Working
    4. Faulty or Incorrect Temperature Control
    5. Inadequate Air Flow Inside Refrigerator
    6. Vents Between Freezer and Refrigerator are Clogged
    7. Faulty Door Switch
    8. Refrigerant Leak

    https://www.doityourself.com/stry/re...ossible-causes

    https://d1vofmza27mmhi.cloudfront.ne...are-manual.pdf

    Em vui vì bỗng dưng se sẻ có được kiến thức tổng quát về tủ lạnh. Em cũng đã gọi thợ hỏi, anh ta nói một lần tới để estimate thì charge $55, sau đó tìm ra bịnh gì sẽ charge material + labor, em hỏi tiếp từ $100 - $500 thì sẽ nằm khoảng nào, anh ta không trả lời được, vì giá trị của cái tủ lạnh này nếu sửa mà gần bằng tủ lạnh mới thì mua cái khác

    Tuần này se sẻ lái lên reset lại, những tip nào đơn giảm thì làm còn phức tạp thì em tiễn ra sân bỏ vì em không còn nhiều thời gian, còn nhiều việc sửa khác bên ngoài nữa.

    ---------------------------

    Hôm nay trước khi làm việc đọc một lèo bài này For Depression and Anxiety, Running Is a Unique Therapy, hay quá, ở Mỹ bị phần trăm cao, nhất là vào mùa Thu, thời tiết ảm đạm, nhiều người trẻ, trung, già gì đều bị depression, em thích phần Think Different. Cám ơn sư huynh đã bỏ công chọn bài hay chia sẻ trong mục này.
    Last edited by chieubuon_09; 10-15-2019 at 03:30 AM.

 

 

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