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  1. #411
    I can't breathe. ốc's Avatar
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    Thuở Bình nhưỡng nổi cơn nóng giận
    Khách Hán thành nhiều nỗi âu lo

    (Đại hàn ngâm khúc)

    Emergency meeting held in South Korea after Kim Jong Un's sister threatens military action
    https://news.yahoo.com/south-korea-c...120850111.html

    South Korea convened an emergency security meeting on Sunday after the sister of North Korea’s leader threatened military action against South Korea in the latest escalation of tensions between the two neighbors.
    North Korea threatens to send army into demilitarised border zone
    https://news.yahoo.com/north-korea-t...023808206.html

    - âu lo: từ chữ OH LORD trong tiếng Anh nghĩa là "Giê su ma lậy chúa tôi..."

    (còn tiếp)

  2. #412
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    Kim mập toàn nói dóc chứ nói gì em gái của ổng. Phụ nữ nói có là không mà.
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  3. #413
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    Ừa có nổ chút xíu. Chắc là cũng tại Antifa.

    North Korea blows up joint liason office north of South Korean border | DW News



    Pháo Khai thành (Kaesong) lung lay bóng nguyệt
    Khói đen xì mờ mịt suốt đêm

    (Chinh phủ ngâm)

  4. #414
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    G4 EA H1N1

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  5. #415
    I can't breathe. ốc's Avatar
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    Nhất nhật tại ngu thiên thu tại tù:

    Thailand seafood fraudsters sentenced to 1,446 years in jail
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-53003685

    Last year, Laemgate seafood restaurant launched a pay-in-advance food promotion online.Up to 20,000 people purchased 50 million Thai baht ($1.6m) worth of vouchers, said broadcaster Thai PBS.

    But the company later said it could not keep up with demand and shut down the restaurant.


    Apichart Bowornbancharak and Prapassorn Bowornbancha were arrested after hundreds of people complained.


    It is not uncommon for those found guilty of fraud in Thailand to be sentenced to such long terms, owing to the number of complaints received.

    However, Thai law limits jail time for public fraud to 20 years.

    In 2017, a Thai court sentenced a fraudster to more than 13,000 years in prison.
    Thiệt ra khó nói ai ngu hơn: chủ tiệm hay người bị lừa? Ăn xong, xỉa răng rồi mới trả tiền.

  6. #416
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    Học tài thi lận:

    EU bans Pakistan national airline flights over pilot exam cheats
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...ot-exam-cheats

    An inquiry into a 22 May Airbus A320 crash that killed 97 people at the southern port city of Karachi resulted in the revelation that 260 of 860 pilots in Pakistan had cheated during their exams, but were still given licences by the Civil Aviation Authority.

    The government has since fired five officials of the regulatory agency and criminal charges are being considered.

    The European Union Aviation Safety Agency said in a letter announcing the ban that it was “concerned about the validity of the Pakistani pilot licenses and that Pakistan, as the State of operator, is currently not capable to certify and oversee its operators and aircraft in accordance with applicable international standards.”

    PIA has grounded 150 pilots for cheating.


    Ba chục năm trước Mỹ bị mang tiếng ám sát tổng thống Pakistan thời lúc đó là me xừ Zia ul Haq. Bây giờ Mỹ có thể đổ thừa cho phi công không có bằng lái. (
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muhammad_Zia-ul-Haq#Death)

  7. #417
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  8. #418
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    All bark and no bites...


    Indian state of Nagaland bans sale of dog meat
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...le-of-dog-meat

    Authorities in India’s north-eastern state of Nagaland have banned the sale of dog meat and halted the import and trading of dogs to be used for food, said officials.

    The remote Christian-majority state’s chief secretary, Temjen Toy, tweeted that the state government had banned all commercial import and trading of dogs. The sale of dog meat, both cooked and uncooked, has also been banned. The move followed an appeal earlier in the week by Indian politician Maneka Gandhi, who urged the Nagaland government to act.

    Gandhi’s appeal came after she received photographs of the trade from a Nagaland-based animal protection group. The appeal led to more than 125,000 people writing to the state government, urging the banning of the dog meat trade.

    Animal rights advocacy group Humane Society International said in a statement: “This is a major turning point in ending the cruelty in India’s hidden dog meat trade.”

    The group estimates up to 30,000 dogs a year are smuggled into Nagaland, where they are sold in live markets. The group said dogs are also regularly beaten to death with wooden clubs.

    Authorities praised the movement to ban the trade. “This is a progressive move. In this day and age, positive social media activism and advocacy has an enormous impact on policymakers. Congrats and thanks to all,” Abu Metha, an adviser to Nagaland’s chief minister, Neiphiu Rio, said in a tweet.

    In Nagaland and other north-eastern states, thousands of dogs each year are illegally captured for consumption from the streets or stolen from homes. These states include Mizoram, Tripura and Arunachal Pradesh, animal rights groups say.
    Có chó đổ vạ cho cơm.
    (Ăn tục ngữ)

  9. #419
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    Một ngày 54 cha bỏ quê xa ....







    Hong Kong immigrant influx expected in Taiwan as China cracks down

    More people in Hong Kong say they are ready to emigrate to Taiwan amid Beijing's new draconian security law. Taipei has laid out a welcome mat, but there is uncertainty over how many immigrants will be accepted.



    Over the last year, Hong Kong-Taiwan relations have grown closer as both find themselves in the crosshairs of more aggressive policies from Beijing. On July 1, Beijing imposed a so-called national security law on Hong Kong, triggering a sense of urgency among many Hong Kongers who are now considering leaving and are looking for immigration destinations.

    Hong Kong is an autonomous Chinese territory under the principle of "one country, two systems," which recognizes Beijing's sovereignty while allowing the territory a level of civil and legal autonomy.

    However, there is widespread concern that the new law puts that principle in jeopardy, and some experts consider it Beijing's final piece in the puzzle to fulfill "one country, one system" in Hong Kong.

    The law criminalizes "subversion" against the Chinese government and "collusion" with foreign forces, along with having a wide interpretation of "terrorist activities."

    A new life in Taiwan?

    As people in Hong Kong fear being prosecuted under the law, a growing number have expressed interest in relocating to Taiwan due to its proximity and cultural similarities.

    In response, the Taiwanese government opened an office on July 1 to help Hong Kongers who seek legal residency in Taiwan, in anticipation of an influx of immigrants.

    "The new office was created precisely to more efficiently evaluate and process applications on a case-by-case basis," said Kolas Yotaka, spokesperson at Taiwan's presidential office, adding that existing resources are sufficient to handle the possible increase in arrivals.

    According to the Mainland Affairs Council in Taiwan, which sets Taiwan's policy towards mainland China, the office has received hundreds of phone calls and emails inquiring about how to move to Taiwan within a week of opening.

    Most inquiries were about how to emigrate to Taiwan through investment or how to apply for schools, according to the Mainland Affairs Council.

    "We think the number of inquiries could increase as the Chinese government continues to impose the national security law. The Taiwan-Hong Kong Services and Exchange Office will closely monitor the development in Hong Kong," a council official told DW.

    In 2019, amid monthslong pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong, nearly 6,000 Hong Kongers moved to Taiwan, a sharp increase compared to the previous year, according to Taiwan's immigration agency.

    A 'comfortable life' in Taipei

    Renowned Hong Kong bookseller Lam Wing-Kee is a Hong Kong immigrant who came to Taiwan in April 2019.

    Since then, he reopened his bookstore, Causeway Bay Books, in Taipei, and has been vocal about the drastic changes that have been taking place in Hong Kong.

    To him, life in Taiwan guarantees basic human rights and he doesn't need to worry about being arrested by the Chinese government under the national security law, which he described as "ridiculous and draconian."

    "Certain books written by pro-democracy figures are viewed as banned books in Hong Kong and raising a piece of white paper during a protest can be deemed illegal under the national security law," Lam told DW.

    "Hong Kong has entered the age of banned books but I can still buy all kinds of books in Taiwan.

    "The Taiwanese government will not ban books in the name of ‘national security,' which shows that Taiwan's legal system is a lot more reasonable. In other words, I'm having a very comfortable life in Taiwan."

    Close to home

    A recent survey published in the journal Foreign Policy showed that 50% of respondents considered leaving Hong Kong, out of those 29% said Taiwan was a top destination, followed by Canada and Australia.

    Lev Nachman, a 2020 Fulbright research fellow in Taiwan and one of the authors of the survey, told DW the result shows that Taiwan is more culturally and linguistically adaptable for Hong Kongers.

    "It also shows the unanimous support that Taiwan's civil society and political sector have shown for supporting Hong Kong people," he said.

    However, Nachman said the Taiwan government needs to reveal more details about the Taiwan-Hong Kong Services and Exchange Office.

    "We still don't know the capacity of Tsai Ing-Wen's assistance program for Hong Kong people," said Nachman.

    "We know there is an office to help Hong Kongers, but we don't know to what extent they will try to welcome more people," he said, adding authorities in Taipei should start "thinking seriously" about a plan for the future.

    Reprisal from Beijing?

    Taiwan's move to assist Hong Kong people will like trigger some heavy response from the Chinese government.

    When Taiwan revealed the plan to assist Hong Kongers in May, China's Taiwan Affairs Office warned Taipei not to interfere with Hong Kong affairs.

    Government spokesperson Yotaka said Taiwan has no intention to manipulate the democratic movement in Hong Kong, and it is determined to keep helping Hong Kong people who might face persecution on a humanitarian basis.

    For Hong Kong people who have settled down in Taiwan, they say it's important for Hong Kong people to establish their own community in their new home, as it helps to preserve Hong Kong's unique culture and language.

    "Since we can expect a large number of Hong Kong people moving to Taiwan over the next few years, it's important to find a way to extend our culture, language and lifestyle in Taiwan," said bookseller Lam Wing-Kee. "If we can gather all Hong Kong people in Taiwan, it can become a way for us to revive the city in our new home."

    /*src.: https://www.dw.com/en/hong-kong-immi...own/a-54189264

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  10. #420
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    Khoẻ nhờ vi trùng.




    Can coronavirus pandemic bring a cycling revolution to India?

    The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented bicycle sales in India, as more and more people try to avoid public transportation for fear of contracting the virus. But the boom could be short-lived.



    The telephone in Tarun Gupta's bicycle shop has been ringing non-stop all day. As he deals with customers, a line forms outside. "Business is booming, but the rush has become mentally exhausting," he said. Like other parts of the world, India has experienced a boom in bicycle sales during the coronavirus pandemic.

    Although most Indian cities are not bicycle-friendly, there has been a sharp increase in recreational cycling during the pandemic as people try to beat cabin fever during lockdowns, get exercise, or avoid commutes on stuffed public transport.

    Gupta and his partner have been running a shop selling high-end bicycles and accessories in a posh South Delhi neighborhood for four years.

    Business suffered during India's nationwide lockdown announced in March, but he has more than made up for it since the easing of restrictions.

    "Every year, March to June is when we see our sales peak. But in the last two months, sales have increased up to five-fold," he told DW. "We've already done enough business for the whole year."

    Gupta still opens his store at 11 in the morning, but he is often forced to close late as customers keep coming in. He said the shop sees about 50-60 customers a day, some of whom are willing to spend over €800 ($916) on a bike. A low-end bike goes for around €60.

    "This kind of boom in the bicycle industry has never happened. Even dealers who've been in the business for 50 years have never seen such sales. This is unprecedented," Gupta said, adding that the long hours are wearing him out.

    Cycling groups in Indian cities

    As more cyclists take to the streets of Indian cities, people are starting groups on social media to meet and organize rides. Gurpreet Singh Kharbanda, a New Delhi resident, created a group in early July. It already has 90 members, about 50 of whom are beginners.

    "People wanted a break from this monotonous routine during the pandemic. There were no outings and no fitness," Kharbanda told DW. "I wanted to create a sense of community bonding and get more people to be active and take up a healthy lifestyle. It's also a great way to meet new people on rides."

    The group mostly meets on weekends and rides around the city. One of the most popular spots for cyclists in New Delhi is the boulevard in front of India's presidential palace, the Rashtrapati Bhavan.

    In the eastern metropolis of Kolkata, cycling enthusiasts have banded together to lobby for more bike lanes and promote the benefits of cycling for the community. The group says it wants to remove "obstacles to cycling in Kolkata while inspiring cycling culture in the city."

    Shiladitya Sinha, a member and organizer of the group, said that they have also brought a lot of people to the sport of cycling since the lockdown began. Some people come to them having never ridden a bike before.

    "As far as Kolkata is concerned, the bicycle boom on one level is a very spontaneous thing, while on another level, it's been a dedicated effort from our side," Sinha told DW.

    Bike-friendly cities

    Most public transport in Kolkata was suspended by lockdowns. The metro alone carries 700,000 passengers daily.

    "People now need private transport more than ever. Most of them cannot afford a car or motorbike, so cycling has become the only option for them now," Sinha said, adding even people who can afford motorized transport are starting to opt for cycling.

    India's Housing and Urban Affairs Ministry said the pandemic has presented an opportunity to make cities more accessible to pedestrians and cyclists.

    In a June advisory, it recommended pedestrianization of at least three markets in every city and more bicycle lanes.

    Sree Kumar Kumaraswamy, the head of urban transport at research firm WRI India, said the current trend could help make cycles an alternative mode of transport in urban areas.

    "Currently cycling is largely seen as something only poor people do. Instead, this needs to become the 'cool thing' the young and educated are involved in," Kumaraswamy told DW.

    "This needs to be enabled by ensuring safety on the road and efforts to enhance the comfort of cyclists," he said, adding that most people are scared away from cycling due to safety concerns.

    "Dedicated cycling lanes with physical demarcation and segregation from other traffic is essential. We need to redesign street intersections to give priority for cyclists and minimize conflict points and enhance safety," he said.

    As lockdowns left commuters without public transport options to travel within the city, cycling provided a temporary solution. But after things get back to normal, rethinking public transport with cycling in mind could make a difference in cities.

    Adding cycling to long-distance commutes using buses is one idea. "Better bus transport with good facilities to walk and cycle in the first mile and last mile will help to make our cities more livable," said Kumaraswamy.

    How long will it last?

    But the brakes could be put on India's bike boom as demand overwhelms supply. Manufacturers weren't prepared to meet the scale and bike shops are running out of stock.

    "I have been losing business for the past 4-5 days. I've had to turn back a lot of prospective customers due to lack of stock," said Gupta.

    "The supply chain is also going to be hit in the coming months due to the India-China border situation," he added. "Importers are facing a lot of scrutiny and customs are not clearing items. We've been waiting for fresh stock for the past 20-25 days."

    A lot of bicycle parts and accessories are sourced from either China or Taiwan.

    And despite the current enthusiasm, there is no guarantee that the cycling boom will be permanent. "Many of my customers tell me that they're not going to use the bicycle after one or two months," said Gupta.

    /* src.: https://www.dw.com/en/india-coronavi...ing/a-54185591
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